Recap – ROH: Unscripted

Recap – ROH: Unscripted

A little background coming in:

At the Four-Way Iron Man match for the Ring of Honor title (I still need to get that event, by the way), Low Ki came out with the win, and became the Ring of Honor World Champion. Coming into Unscripted I believe he’s gotten a few title defenses under his belt, before facing Xavier (who made it into the quarter-finals at Road To The Title before getting beat by Red).

However, the start of the show is going to be a tournament to crown the first ROH Tag Team Champions – and unlike Road To The Title, we’re actually going to crown the champions at this show!

On the one hand, it’s another tournament show, and as I’ve said before, Tournaments tend to be meh, just because of the nature of the format.

However, since this is a Tag Team tournament, the tag team part may work in the tournament’s favor. I’ll be keeping an eye on this as I watch the event.

Recap – ROH: Road To The Title

Recap – ROH: Road To The Title

Alright, this show is going to be focused around a tournament to see who gets a shot at the ROH Championship at the next event. The tournament is bracket-style divided into 4 blocks, with 4 wrestlers per block. Whoever wins each block will advance to the final at the next event, where the 4 will square off in an 60 Minute Iron Man match to see who wins the title – the man who wins the most falls within the time limit wins the belt. Now that I’ve gotten that out of the way, on with the tournament.

Recap – ROH: The Era of Honor Begins

Recap – ROH: The Era of Honor Begins

Background:
ECW was dead to begin with. Prior to its demise, one of its main distributors for tapes of its events was RF Video, run by Rob Feinstein, who had made a fair amount of cash distributing video of events of independent wrestling promotions, including ECW (which became their biggest seller). To boost revenues following , Feinstein started a new promotion to fill the gap left by ECW’s demise, using both ECW alumni who were not currently under exclusive contract with WWE (or other promotions) and young candidates from wrestling schools like Shawn Michaels’ Texas Wrestling Acadamy. As a change from the ECW style, and to differentiate itself from the WWE, and from promotions local to South Philadelphia which had co-opted the ECW style (CZW, XPW*) central to the concept of Ring of Honor was the “Code of Honor” rules which, Kayfabe-wise, all wrestlers were supposed to follow, be they faces or heels.